990 Followers
65 Following
cplesley

C. P. Lesley

Bookworm, writer, radio host—I blog about history, fiction, and publishing in the Internet Age. You can find the full blog on my website. This space is for books.

More summer reading recommendations from me and my fellow authors at Five Directions Press: Books We Loved, Aug. 2016. One example pasted in below.

 

Black Run - Antonio Manzini Adam's Rib: A Rocco Schiavone Mystery (Rocco Schiavone Mysteries) - Antonio Manzini

Tired of those 98-degree days? Take a literary trip to the Italian Alps in the company of the hard-boiled, not to say truculent detective Rocco Schiavone in this week's blog post.

The Swan Princess (Legends of the Five Directions) (Volume 3) - C. P. Lesley

Interview with me, conducted by fellow author Joan Schweighardt. If you've ever wondered how I came to write an entire series based in 1530s Russia, of all places—never mind how I came to write fiction—this is your chance to find out for free. Just click on the link.

A new release by Five Directions Press and an interview with last week's featured author are the subject of this week's blog post. Love that cover!

 

Can't believe I forgot to post this one here—and where is the gorgeous cover picture? http://blog.cplesley.com/2016/07/cooking-in-klondike.html

 

 

Book review post on Bridgette R. Alexander's YA mystery, Southern Gothic, with news about The Golden Lynx, the soon-to-close Summer of History contest, and a lovely book review site in the UK.

 

Interview with Hana Samek Norton (whose beautiful cover is below) at New Books in Historical Fiction.

 

The Girl from The Savoy: A Novel - Hazel Gaynor

Q&A with Hazel Gaynor in this week's post, "Dancing at the Savoy."

And After the Fire - Lauren Belfer

This week's blog post looks at questions raised by Lauren Belfer's new novel and includes a link to my free podcast interview with her, where we discuss the issues in more depth.

Tristan and Iseult - J.D.   Smith

New Books We Loved post, including The Girl at the Savoy, The Day after Death, A Girl Is a Half-Formed Thing, and Big Little Lies—as well as a spotlight on JD Smith—on the Five Directions Press newsletter page.

The Forgotten Flapper: A Novel of Olive Thomas - Laini Giles The Boston Girl: A Novel - Anita Diamant Rare Objects: A Novel - Kathleen Tessaro

Are the 1910s–1930s making a comeback? See this week's post, “The Fog of War.”

Antonia Barclay and Her Scottish Claymore: A Rebellious Romantic Comedy - Jane Carter Barrett

Q&A with author Jane Carter Barrett about her new historical romance, set in 16th-century Scotland, is the subject of this week’s post.

The California Wife

New podcast interview with Kristen Harnisch at New Books in Historical Fiction about her latest novel, The California Wife. Cover shown below, as it doesn't seem to have made it to BookLikes yet (it is very new).

 

Kingdom of the Shades (Tarkei Chronicles Book 2) - C. P. Lesley
  • Sorry to be late with this (life has been hectic). This week's blog post is about the difference between the reality and the illusion in women's lives.

 

Life in Quarantine

This week's post features my interview with Diane McKinney-Whetstone about her newest novel, Lazaretto. The interview itself is at New Books in Historical Fiction. She's a vibrant and interesting speaker, so the podcast is well worth your time—and it's free!

 

Suffer the Little Children (The Chronicles of Christoval Alvarez Book 5) - Ann Swinfen

I have enjoyed all of this series—some books more than others, but every one has its own charms. This one was a particular pleasure. Kit is installed as an assistant physician at St. Thomas's Hospital, the second great facility caring for the poor in late 16th-century England, and in charge of the maternity ward. Abandoned, abused, and unwanted children are everywhere in this novel—the most compelling a group of young urchins who beg for food outside the playhouse where Kit's friend Simon makes his living as an actor. A young playwright named Will (with an unpronounceable last name—guess who?) has just joined the theater, and there are amusing references to his plays. But the central story line involves the approaching death of Sir Francis Walsingham, the potential threats to his secret service as a result, a kidnapped child, and, of course, a plot against the throne. It's all fast-paced and riveting and sets Kit up for the next journey, to Muscovy, which I loved even more.